The Super Bowl Trivia Quiz

The First Super Bowl Touchdown Scorer: Max McGee

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Hey there, trivia enthusiasts! Welcome to another deep dive into the annals of sports history. Today, we’re delving into another question from the Super Bowl Trivia Quiz about the player who scored the first touchdown in Super Bowl history.

For all you sports aficionados out there, this one’s for you! So, buckle up and get ready to unravel the facts about the early days of the largest spectacle in American sports.

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Scoring the First Touchdown in Super Bowl History

In the inaugural Super Bowl game played on January 15, 1967, Max McGee, a wide receiver for the Green Bay Packers, achieved a remarkable feat: he scored the very first touchdown in Super Bowl history.

McGee’s achievement was all the more remarkable because he wasn’t even supposed to be playing in the game. His legendary story adds an extra layer of intrigue to this historic moment.

Max McGee’s Unexpected Heroism

McGee, then 34 years old, had spent most of the 1966 season on the bench, catching only four passes. Without expecting to play, he reportedly violated the team’s curfew the night before the game and showed up to the Super Bowl, expecting to spend the day on the bench as usual.

However, fate had other plans. When the starting receiver, Boyd Dowler, got injured during the game’s first drive, McGee was suddenly called into action, and the rest is history.

The Historic Scoring Moment

Surprisingly, McGee’s first touchdown catch came on a play that wasn’t even designed for him. Quarterback Bart Starr’s pass was intended for Carroll Dale, but when Dale slipped, McGee, who had come into the game with a hangover, made an incredible one-handed catch in the end zone, securing his place in Super Bowl history.

McGee’s touchdown in Super Bowl I set the tone for what has since become one of the most-watched sporting events in the world, making it an unforgettable and historic moment in football history.

Misconceptions about the First Super Bowl Touchdown Scorer

Jim Taylor

Many fans might assume that Jim Taylor, the Green Bay Packers’ star running back, scored the first touchdown in Super Bowl history. However, despite Taylor’s impressive career and his significant contributions to the Packers’ success, he did not score the first touchdown in the inaugural Super Bowl.

While Taylor was undoubtedly a key player for the Packers during the early Super Bowl era, it was his teammate, Max McGee, who made history by scoring the first touchdown in Super Bowl I.

Paul Hornung

Another common misconception is that Paul Hornung, known for his versatility as a running back and placekicker, was the first player to reach the end zone in a Super Bowl. However, similar to Jim Taylor, Hornung did not secure this historic achievement.

While Hornung’s impact on the early Super Bowl teams cannot be overlooked, it is Max McGee who should be credited with the initial touchdown in Super Bowl history, a feat that has left an indelible mark on the legacy of the game.

Bart Starr

Bart Starr’s exceptional talent as a quarterback and his pivotal role in leading the Green Bay Packers to victory in the first two Super Bowls might lead some to believe that he was responsible for the first touchdown in the Super Bowl.

However, despite Starr’s remarkable performance in Super Bowl I, it was actually Max McGee who surprisingly stepped up to seize the honor of scoring the first touchdown, forever etching his name into football history.

Conclusion

In the high-stakes inaugural Super Bowl, it was Green Bay Packers’ Max McGee who etched his name in the history books by scoring the first touchdown. His unexpected heroics set the stage for the grandeur and unpredictability that has since become synonymous with the Super Bowl.

Feeling inspired by Super Bowl history? Test your knowledge and relive these memorable moments by taking our Super Bowl Trivia Quiz now!

Professor Leonard Whitman